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Hauser & Wirth - The Roth Bar & Bookstore

Opening Hours
Today: Closed
Tues:
10am–6pm
Wed:
10am–6pm
Thurs:
10am–6pm
Fri:
10am–6pm
Sat:
10am–6pm
Sun:
Closed
Location
542 West 22nd Street
Neighborhoods
Hauser & Wirth   The Roth Bar & Bookstore 1 Art and Photography Galleries Cafes Chelsea

The interior of the Hauser and Wirth Bookshop isn’t unlike a gallery in some ways, with white brick walls and sky-high ceilings. It is certainly not out of place among the many galleries populating the surrounding area, but the bookstore is a refreshing twist on the art experience. The titles themselves range from zines to more straight-forward coffee table books, begging to be cracked open by curious customers. And, venturing towards the back, one will find The Roth, a vibrant bar and cafe.

Hauser and Wirth is a renowned Swiss art gallery with locations worldwide, and they have been publishing art books for a number of years. Although the space in Chelsea is partially devoted to gallery space, the location has other offerings: mainly, a bookstore that operates as a convenient hub for the creative community. The Roth Bar gives a practical function to a fairly non-practical bookstore; fostering art and collaboration by serving as a meeting point for the artistic population which flourishes in Chelsea. An employee told Manhattan Sideways that she used to come to the cafe with her professors, calling the space “a nice pitstop” for classes, tours, and other groups.

While Hauser and Wirth’s uptown location on 69th Street plays to more traditional ideas of an art gallery, the bookshop aims to be more accessible. Although it initially focused on books that Hauser and Wirth published, it has since expanded to include more relevant cultural publications, and they make a special effort to spotlight small presses, and to bring in books by artists here in New York. The ultimate goal is to create a welcoming space where residents of the surrounding neighborhood can come to hang out.

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Hauser & Wirth   The Roth Bar & Bookstore 1 Art and Photography Galleries Cafes Chelsea

More Art and Photography Galleries nearby

Lost Gem
C24 Gallery 1 Art and Photography Galleries undefined

C24 Gallery

While 24th Street contains several world-renowned galleries, C24 is a less recognizable, but no less amazing art gallery. It was opened in September of 2011 by four partners: Emre and Maide Kurttepeli, Mel Dogan, and Ali Soyak. Though none were working directly in the art industry, all were united by a passion for art. “They thought, ‘Where’s the best place to open a gallery? New York! ” explained Michelle Maigret, the director. “’Where’s the best place in New York? Chelsea! Where’s the best street in Chelsea? 24th Street! ” In 2015, C24’s building was purchased, so the owners found a new space down the block. This time, however, C24 will not be pushed out. In keeping with a block norm, C24 is the owner of its building, and with the new location came a new vision. “I think we have more of a direction now, ” Michelle said. “When we moved out of our old space, we went through the artists and moved out the ones who weren’t going with the direction the directors wanted to take. ” It was not just a move, as Meghan Schaetzle, the gallery manager, clarified, but “a rebirth of the gallery. ” The new C24 is more spacious than most of the surrounding galleries. There is an atrium as well as a large main room, featuring windows and glass doors, to create a naturally lit and generally welcoming environment. “Often, artists get restricted by gallery space, ” explained Amanda Uribe, director of sales. “But here, they’re inspired by the possibilities. ” The unique space allows C24 to step outside of what one might typically see on 24th Street - exhibiting all media, from miniature sculptures to monumental paintings to video art - and, recently, they have been moving towards multimedia or, as Michelle put it, “different media” displays. Rather than follow in the footsteps of more established galleries and try to feature the “big hits, ” C24 aims to represent contemporary, mid-career artists who are pushing the boundaries of their craft. As Michelle told me, “The big name artists are great and it’s always good to see their shows, but we have something different, fun, and interactive - and people always respond to it. There’s a different attitude, different feel, something fresh here. ” In keeping with that theme, C24’s curation attempts to push boundaries with an international focus and is proud to feature a geographically diverse roster of artists. Additionally, C24 brings in an outside curator each year to organize a show in their space. When it comes to the art world, keep an eye on C24: For the young gallery, things are only looking up. “We’ve been applying to some of the more prestigious art fairs and getting wait-listed, rather than flat-out rejected, ” Michelle said. “We’re about to hit it. ” Meghan concurred: “Stay tuned and see how we grow! ”

More places on 22nd Street

Lost Gem
The Pen and Brush 1 Art and Photography Galleries Founded Before 1930 undefined

The Pen and Brush

“We come together on the common ground of arts, letters, and women owning their own destinies, ” stated Executive Director Dawn Delikat. For well over a century, Pen and Brush has been dedicated to supporting women in the visual arts and literature. The organization was founded by two sisters and painters, Janet and Mimi Lewis, who were frustrated with being barred from art societies solely on the basis of their gender. Knowing of so many talented women suffering a similar fate, the siblings decided to create Pen and Brush to “stop asking for permission and forge their own way in the city. ”Though the group was nomadic for thirty years, it was able to purchase its first location in 1923. Decades later in the early 1960s, the ladies celebrated paying off their mortgage by dressing in their finest ballgowns and burning the contract in the fireplace. “Women persevering is as much of our understory as anything else. ” The organization carries the torch passed down by these remarkable women, whose members include First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and a number of Nobel laureates. Today, Pen and Brush’s goal remains the same, albeit adapted to twenty-first-century circumstances. As such, it makes space for both women and non-binary voices — better reflecting our evolving conceptions of the gender spectrum — and works to bring in the diversity that has been kept out of the canon “not for lack of talent, but for lack of access. ” To this end, Pen and Brush functions as an art gallery and a book publisher, where visual artists and writers from across the world can submit their work. The group evaluates submissions, seeking pieces “that need to be supported, ” either for expressing something that has not been said before or for demonstrating an incredibly high skill level. This has meant giving career-making opportunities to veteran artists looking to break the glass ceiling of their field, gifted students just out of an MFA program, and self-taught artists who received no formal introduction to the art world. Achieving true equality in the arts and letters may seem a daunting task, but Pen and Brush is tireless in its mission to give a platform to brilliant women and non-binary creators. “We can’t give up on them. We have to build into the future so that we can keep passing that torch, so maybe someday, it won’t be needed. ”