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Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II

Opening Hours
Today: 11am–6pm
Wed:
11am–6pm
Thurs:
11am–6pm
Fri:
11am–6pm
Sat:
10am–6pm
Sun:
10am–6pm
Mon:
11am–6pm
Location
156 East 64th Street
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 1 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East

Olivia, a member of the Manhattan Sideways team, was in a state of fevered anticipation when she realized we were inching closer to 64th Street, where the southernmost Alice's Tea Cup is located. The whimsical tea shop has three different "Chapters," and this is the second in the series. Unlike the original location, which sits on the ground floor, this chapter has two floors, decorated with Wonderland characters and Lewis Carroll's cryptic text.

The tearoom is owned by Lauren and Haley Fox, sisters who have loved tea for as long as they can remember. And, they have always been passionate about everything Alice in Wonderland: they grew up on the Upper West Side, just a short distance from the Alice in Wonderland statue in Central Park, and both adored Lewis Carroll's books. It made perfect sense, therefore, to open an Alice in Wonderland-themed teahouse in 2001. The eatery has become an enormous success, and has attracted many different groups of people: like the book, the tea house, though full of curlicues, bright purple hues, and fairy dust, is not geared towards children. Children are frequent and enthusiastic visitors, but it is just as likely that one might see a business meeting between two creative types, an exuberant reunion between friends, or a solitary adult diner nursing a pot of tea.

The tea list is extensive and scrumptious. "List" is a misnomer – it is more of a booklet. Olivia has tried at least fifteen of their teas so far and has not made even a dent in their selection. Each tea is brought out in a personal pastel pot, to be poured into one of the eclectic mismatched cups and saucers that decorate the repurposed sewing machine tables. The tea also makes its way into the food menu: Olivia raves about the smoky Lapsang Souchong chicken breast, made using a Chinese black tea that smells and tastes like a bonfire.

Despite the brilliant concept, the adorable decor and the excellent selection of teas, it is the afternoon tea service that steals the show. Diners can choose between "The Nibble," "The Mad Hatter," and "The Jabberwocky," depending on how hungry they are, and servers will bring them a heavenly three-tiered stand layered with finger sandwiches, desserts, and scones - without a doubt, the most popular being the pumpkin scone, drizzled with caramel syrup.

So as to have the full Alice in Wonderland experience, there is a mini shop up front where Haley and Lauren's cookbook, Alice's Tea Cup, is on display alongside many other trinkets such as fairy wings, picture books, and anything one might need to reproduce their own magical tea party at home.

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Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 17 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 18 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 19 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 20 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 21 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 22 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 23 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 1 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 2 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 3 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 4 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 5 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 6 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 7 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 8 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 9 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 10 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 11 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 12 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 13 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 14 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 15 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East
Alice's Tea Cup Chapter II 16 American Breakfast Brunch Tea Shops Lenox Hill Upper East Side Uptown East

More American nearby

Lost Gem
The East Pole 1 Brunch American undefined

The East Pole

If it were not for the diners sunning themselves in the outdoor seats, I might have walked straight past this restaurant. The townhouse is completely unmarked, I learned, because businesses in historic buildings are not allowed to add outdoor signage. I settled down inside with a few of the Manhattan Sideways team and we treated ourselves to a relaxing hour, thoroughly enjoying a fresh, light meal that was as delicious as it was beautifully presented. An interesting take on the traditional bread and butter was put down before us - radishes with olive tapenade on a freshly cut loaf. I was in cheese heaven as I cut into the oozing, warm, perfect burrata with beets, and Olivia ordered the house-made falafel salad with yoghurt sauce, which she said was "marvelous. " Erika was pleased with her choice of the Kale Caesar salad. Everything tasted like a fresh spring day, and left us feeling energized. The atmosphere also added to the sense of rejuvenation, with simple whitewashed tables, cherry blossom bouquets, and a perfectly placed skylight. The restaurant is a big player in the farm-to-table movement. We spoke with Chef Sammy Diaz, who explained that he goes to the farmer's market four times a week in order to find the freshest ingredients for the menu. He works closely with executive chef Joseph Capozzi as they establish relationships with local foragers. The restaurant tries to get most of its ingredients from no farther than Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Sammy entertained us for quite some time with his stories, and his commitment to the food he cooks with every day, but I believe the best was when he elaborated on "Goatober. " Each week for the entire month of October, a whole goat is delivered to East Pole, and Sammy gets to be creative with as many dishes as he can for 31 days. Sammy showed us the impressive upstairs room, which can be used for private parties. It has a second bar, and a long wooden table with fresh sprigs of herbs for decoration. The feel is more of a lovely cottage, rather than a metropolitan New York restaurant. The walls are decorated in maps and sea charts, in keeping with the vague nautical and travel theme suggested by the restaurant's name. Everything about the eatery offered a sunny, fresh escape from city life into a culinary garden.

Lost Gem
Serendipity 1 American Dessert undefined

Serendipity

As we were entering Serendipity 3, Olivia, a member of the Sideways team, revealed to me that when she was a little girl, she wanted her room to look exactly like the inside of Serendipity, with every inch of space covered with eclectic art and knick-knacks, and the walls lined with quirky mirrors, and garlands dripping from the rafters. Upon returning to Serendipity, after a gap of ten years or so, she was delighted to see that little had changed. The ceiling continues to teem with everything from street signs to priceless Tiffany lampshades, and an Andy Warhol doll wrapped in a pink boa hangs over one table, a nod to the pop art prince who named Serendipity one of his favorite New York restaurants. Even the menu remains how she remembered it - like a game of I Spy – can you spot the Hebrew eye chart hidden among the food offerings? The colorful trip down the rabbit hole continues upstairs to what looks like a tea house ballroom. Dancing bears made of shrubbery and Christmas lights sparkle in the windows while antique mirrors make everything seem larger and dreamlike. A bedazzled parrot sits on the mantel, framed by floor-to-ceiling paintings. Patch Carradine, Calvin Holt, and Stephen Bruce decided to create a "coffee house boutique, " the first of its kind, while all living together in Little Italy. The name came about when Patch, a crossword puzzle master, solved a clue with a word that struck a chord with him: "serendipity. " The founders called themselves the "Serendipity 3" and the name stuck. Stephen, the only one of the three still living, runs the place with the same whimsy and delightful eccentricity that defined it when it first began. Olivia is not alone in her childhood love for Serendipity. The restaurant has called to young girls since it opened in 1954. One of my first clear memories of time spent in New York was when I was twelve and my mom took me to Serendipity after seeing the Broadway show 1776. Both of our adoration and nostalgia is not only due to the extraordinary decor, or the foot long hotdogs and challah French toast, but it is also due to their notorious desserts - especially, of course, the Frozen Hot Chocolate!

More places on 64th Street

Lost Gem
Nicolo Melissa Antiques 1 Antiques undefined

Nicolo Melissa Antiques

Nicolo Melissa Antiques & Art is a story that combines a personal relationship with a passion for the arts. Melissa Magid met Nicolo Camisa, originally from Italy, when he was studying English in the United States, and the two fell in love. Nicolo had been trained in the family's antique business since he was sixteen, and so it made perfect sense for Nicolo to open a small antique store in Manhattan with his new bride. Melissa admits that she did not know much about antiques before Nicolo, but when she traveled to Italy to meet his family, and found his home filled with treasured pieces spanning the ages, she recognized the importance of this world that Nicolo had grown up in. And it did not take her long to decide that she wanted to join him as a partner. Though their gallery is completely separate from Nicolo’s family’s business, Melissa told me that they frequently keep in touch with his Italian kin in order to trade secrets and discuss their acquisitions. A favorite story that Melissa enjoys sharing is when her older son, at the age of two, already seemed to have an eye for fine art: When they took him to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and he was staring up at some of the paintings on the wall, he gestured to his father saying, “Papa, bring this one home! ” Because the young child was so accustomed to accompanying his parents on buying trips, he did not understand the difference between viewing art in a museum and their vast collection that his parents have amassed. Both in their home and at the gallery, Nicolo and Melissa’s two boys are surrounded by Renaissance bronzes, classical sculptures, and micro mosaics. Nicolo quickly added that despite the variety, their collection is carefully curated, and forms a cohesive whole that he hand selects both from travels around the United States and abroad. The gallery specializes in artwork, furniture, and decor from the 19th century and earlier. Melissa showed us some of her favorite pieces, including a Florentine 19th Century ebony cabinet and a pair of Cesare Lapini white marble angels. It became clear rather quickly that Melissa is quite proud to run a local, family-owned gallery. As she so sweetly described the first venture that they embarked on as a couple, "This is our first child. ”

Lost Gem
Remorca Fitness 1 Fitness Centers and Gyms undefined

Remorca Fitness

"If I won the lottery, I would continue to do the same thing every day, " Dennis Remorca told me as I stepped off the elevator and introduced myself to him. Clearly passionate about his fitness centers on the Upper East Side, Dennis went on to tell me that he has been training children from the age of seven up to a woman who is ninety-six. He emphasized the importance of the relationship that he and his fellow trainers have developed with each of their clients. Laughing, Dennis said, "I have like fifty moms always making sure that I eat. " Trained in physical therapy, Dennis shared with me that he comes from a family who practice medicine, and they did not understand how he could make a career in PT. I believe that he has shown them that it is possible, for after four years owning his gym on 74th Street, he decided it was time to open yet another facility on 64th. Upstairs in the newly converted Weston House - a building that was completed in 1881 by architect Theodore Weston, founder of the Metropolitan Museum of Art - the space is perfect for private training sessions. Filled with state-of-the-art equipment and a friendly staff - one was a principal dancer for American Ballet while another was a trainer for the Milwaukee Brewers - I have no doubt that this is a terrific environment for workouts. And, I learned from Antonia, the owner of Altesi downstairs, that in the warmer months, Dennis will be offering yoga classes outside in the garden of the restaurant followed by a healthy breakfast.

Lost Gem
Vanessa Noel 1 Women's Shoes undefined

Vanessa Noel

"A shoe is not an accessory, but a necessity, " Vanessa Noel declared as I sat with the woman who has been a top shoe designer since the 1980s. I went on to learn that making a shoe requires equal parts design and engineering, because the success of a shoe depends on balance and form. As Vanessa explained, anyone can decorate a shoe, but to actually form a piece of footwear to fit a woman's feet is a truly difficult task. Vanessa is very conscious of comfort – "I can't stand when I see women who are unable to walk because of their shoes, " she told me. "It is a sign that their shoes are not well made. " Vanessa, who claims to often walk around the city in six inch heels, makes shoes that will not cause women to need to call a cab after two blocks. She is very proud of the fact that just the other day she "put a congresswoman back in high heels. " Vanessa describes her shoes as "comfy, sexy, elegant, and beautiful. " She designs the entire line herself, and has everything handmade in Italy. She loves discovering and playing with exotic materials. I was able to get a glimpse of her stretch alligator skin that she created herself, and which has become her trademark. It had twenty-four carat gold embedded in the high-quality Louisiana skin, allowing the brilliant shine and color to permeate through the entire material. Vanessa continued to walk me through her workshop as she shared a prototype of translucent alligator, which was streaked neon pink. While gazing at her treasure trove of shoes, she told me about an extraordinary order that she once produced: over-the-knee flat stretch orange python boots. Although customer service is a key element of Vanessa's business model, she is not solely concerned with the needs of her clients; Vanessa also tries to look out for the people producing her shoes. When she became aware that some of the ancient Italian tannery families were developing cancer because of the chromium used in their processing techniques, she commenced researching better methods. She then discussed her interest in being chemical-free more generally - and that passion drove her to open the ecologically friendly Hotel Green in Nantucket. Vanessa's most recent addition to the shop is a new line of handbags. She had been making them for herself for years, but was encouraged to design some for her customers after being spotted with one on a fashion runway. They come in a wide variety of bright, fun colors and are made with high-quality Italian leather, similar to her shoes. At this moment, while sitting and chatting, in strolled Emma, Vanessa's mother, the delightful inspiration behind some of the bags. I watched as Emma headed straight for these new additions and joked about taking one, before being told that the design was actually called the "Emma bag. " Smiling, her daughter said, "you are welcome to take one. " After looking very pleased, Emma turned to me and began sharing stories from her daughter's childhood, as Vanessa looked on with an amused grimace. Although difficult to believe, Emma said that Vanessa was "a monster" as a child, who once, at the age of four, with her little bit of cash, convinced a Greek herder to allow her to ride his donkey halfway up the mountain. I continued to be fascinated as Emma described their visit to the Emilio Pucci palace with her sister and Emma, and had dresses made for all three of them. Vanessa’s latest creative endeavor is the Noel Shoe Museum, which will be the first of its kind in the United States. It will display shoes from around the world, spanning several centuries, with an aim of showcasing their creativity and the history of their design and manufacturing. Nevertheless, Vanessa’s greatest mission remains to repair women’s relationships with luxury footwear. In her words, “I try to make glamorous shoes that essentially become an extension of a woman’s leg. ”

More Brunch nearby

Lost Gem
Amali 1 Brunch Mediterranean undefined

Amali

Through an ivy-covered lattice front is Amali, a pan-Mediterranean restaurant with an earthy, minimalist interior marked by vases of twining branches. There, we met Steve Tzolis, the owner, who told us that he had been an attorney for many years before making the decision to join his partners in opening Amali in 2011. Steve has his finger on the pulse of every part of the restaurant. One of his old fraternity brothers, Caleb Mulvena, did the design. Caleb was just getting his company, Mapos LLC, off the ground. So, Steve thought it was a perfect way for two former brothers to help each other start their businesses. Mapos is a green company; therefore, reused materials comprise a large percent of the restaurant. Steve assured us that he does have a Mediterranean background as both of his parents are Greek (he calls himself "generation 1. 5"). He has a soft spot in his heart for Kiki's on the island of Mykonos, and based part of his restaurant decor on this Greek tavern. The combination of Steve's desire for the restaurant to have a Mediterranean tilt, and Chef Rachel Goulet's specialty in Northern Italian and French cuisine, makes for a fascinating menu. Rachel also adds some Greek accents to her American classics dishes, as some of the Manhattan Sideways team witnessed when sampling her divine lamb burger with tzatziki, as well as a perfectly seasoned Linguine Carbonara with a generous serving of bacon. We were interested in speaking to Steve about East 60th Street and all of the changes that have occurred on this block over the years. He said that when Amali first opened, it was one of the few eateries on a relatively dead street. Since then, more restaurants have followed, including Rotisserie Georgette and Il Mulino Uptown. Of course, there were a few institutions already residing on 60th Street, and Steve has a wonderful story about when he stopped by for a visit one day with Cathy Trebaux at Le Veau d'Or. She was quite busy on this particular day, and she very casually asked Steve to please tend the bar. Ultimately, Steve loves his side street location, and the fact that the neighborhood is turning into a restaurant strip only makes it better.

Lost Gem
The East Pole 1 Brunch American undefined

The East Pole

If it were not for the diners sunning themselves in the outdoor seats, I might have walked straight past this restaurant. The townhouse is completely unmarked, I learned, because businesses in historic buildings are not allowed to add outdoor signage. I settled down inside with a few of the Manhattan Sideways team and we treated ourselves to a relaxing hour, thoroughly enjoying a fresh, light meal that was as delicious as it was beautifully presented. An interesting take on the traditional bread and butter was put down before us - radishes with olive tapenade on a freshly cut loaf. I was in cheese heaven as I cut into the oozing, warm, perfect burrata with beets, and Olivia ordered the house-made falafel salad with yoghurt sauce, which she said was "marvelous. " Erika was pleased with her choice of the Kale Caesar salad. Everything tasted like a fresh spring day, and left us feeling energized. The atmosphere also added to the sense of rejuvenation, with simple whitewashed tables, cherry blossom bouquets, and a perfectly placed skylight. The restaurant is a big player in the farm-to-table movement. We spoke with Chef Sammy Diaz, who explained that he goes to the farmer's market four times a week in order to find the freshest ingredients for the menu. He works closely with executive chef Joseph Capozzi as they establish relationships with local foragers. The restaurant tries to get most of its ingredients from no farther than Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Sammy entertained us for quite some time with his stories, and his commitment to the food he cooks with every day, but I believe the best was when he elaborated on "Goatober. " Each week for the entire month of October, a whole goat is delivered to East Pole, and Sammy gets to be creative with as many dishes as he can for 31 days. Sammy showed us the impressive upstairs room, which can be used for private parties. It has a second bar, and a long wooden table with fresh sprigs of herbs for decoration. The feel is more of a lovely cottage, rather than a metropolitan New York restaurant. The walls are decorated in maps and sea charts, in keeping with the vague nautical and travel theme suggested by the restaurant's name. Everything about the eatery offered a sunny, fresh escape from city life into a culinary garden.

Lost Gem
Ristorante Altesi 1 Italian Brunch Breakfast undefined

Ristorante Altesi

Walking down the stairs and passing the espresso bar to enter Altesi, I felt like I had been transported onto an Italian street: the design was so perfectly European, with a calmness and slower tempo that signaled a Mediterranean location far removed from the bustle of Manhattan. The true jewel of Altesi, however, is the owner Paolo Alavian, who, after introducing himself and his very sweet wife, Antonia, treated us like royalty. Paolo's generosity and kindness is extended to each and every individual who enters his restaurant. As he guided us through the orange and cream interior, with wine trellises tucked into geometric patterns on the walls and out into the lovely backyard garden, he warmly greeted his guests before sitting himself down to speak with us. As we savored our veritable feast, beginning with sauteed artichoke, octopus in yogurt and tuna carpaccio, Paolo entertained us with stories. Having opened in 2014, he said that it had been an excellent first year. His other restaurants in Soho - Savore and L'Ulivo - have been around for many years, but, surprisingly, it is on the Upper East Side that Paolo finds the people to be the most supportive and friendly. As he said, "the neighborhood really wants you to succeed. It is the first place I have found where people are protecting the businesses. " Paolo does his part to create a neighborhood hotspot. He let us know that he often hosts breakfast and yoga sessions in his back garden. As our second course of pappardelle with duck, black truffles, and peas along with pasta decorated with chanterelles covered in melted pecorino cheese arrived, Paolo continued to amuse us with stories from his childhood and his arrival in the US. Paolo may be one of the few Italian restaurateurs who did not receive his love of food from his family. He explained that his mother, though a wonderful woman, was a terrible cook, and that until the age of eighteen, he weighed only ninety pounds. His parents, both pharmacists, assumed that he would follow in their footsteps and study pharmacology at the University of Miami, where he received a scholarship. Arriving in Florida, it did not take long, however, for Paolo to realize that his passion laid elsewhere. While continuing his studies, he got his first job in a restaurant as a dishwasher, and then quickly worked his way up to busboy and bartender. He would leave class early to "go to the bathroom" in order to get to his shift on time. He never dropped a class, though - Paolo is a big believer in education. He has always told his employees, "If you want to go to school, I will help you. I will work with you. "Paolo described his love for the restaurant business because it is a true meritocracy, where promotions happen quickly and fairly. His story of moving up the ladder sounds like a fairy tale: as a dishwasher, he was bullied by the kitchen staff, and his hands were cracked and bleeding because his coworkers would keep unplugging the dishwasher so that he would have to do everything by hand. When his employer, his figurative fairy godmother, found out, she moved him to the front room as a busboy. As the third course arrived and the Manhattan Sideways team indulged in a remarkable veal cutlet Milanese, a beautiful piece of salmon with exceptional spring vegetables, and a whole branzino, we continued to be impressed by Paolo's extraordinary generosity to others in need. He spoke of his effort to teach a trade to a person with Down Syndrome, hoping that by working in his restaurant that this person would have a skill that they can use throughout their life. Paolo also told us about the success of the Manhattan Girls Chorus, a group that was begun in 2011 by a patron of the restaurant, Michelle Oesterle. Her passion for music and her desire to provide an outlet for girls who are experiencing bullying, unpleasant situations at home, learning disabilities, or any of the other difficulties in simply being a teenager, drove her to found this organization. It is here that Michelle is able to provide a safe haven for the girls to come each week to practice and confide in one another. Having had the extraordinary opportunity to attend their first gala at the Baryshnikov Arts Center and to hear these young girls share their stories of their personal struggles was incredibly touching, but then they gathered to sing, and my heart could not stop pounding. They were magnificent. Paolo, too, has been affected by these teenagers and has taken one of them under his wing. In her, he recognized a well-behaved, smart girl who needed help, and he hired her to work in his restaurant. He has now, essentially, become her father: mentoring her, pushing her to be the best person she can be, and, Paolo jokingly said, "I even crack down on any clients who ask for her phone number. " Paolo explained that he has always remembered the woman who promoted him to busboy when he was having a hard time, and will always feel the desire to give people similar opportunities.

More Breakfast nearby

Lost Gem
Ristorante Altesi 1 Italian Brunch Breakfast undefined

Ristorante Altesi

Walking down the stairs and passing the espresso bar to enter Altesi, I felt like I had been transported onto an Italian street: the design was so perfectly European, with a calmness and slower tempo that signaled a Mediterranean location far removed from the bustle of Manhattan. The true jewel of Altesi, however, is the owner Paolo Alavian, who, after introducing himself and his very sweet wife, Antonia, treated us like royalty. Paolo's generosity and kindness is extended to each and every individual who enters his restaurant. As he guided us through the orange and cream interior, with wine trellises tucked into geometric patterns on the walls and out into the lovely backyard garden, he warmly greeted his guests before sitting himself down to speak with us. As we savored our veritable feast, beginning with sauteed artichoke, octopus in yogurt and tuna carpaccio, Paolo entertained us with stories. Having opened in 2014, he said that it had been an excellent first year. His other restaurants in Soho - Savore and L'Ulivo - have been around for many years, but, surprisingly, it is on the Upper East Side that Paolo finds the people to be the most supportive and friendly. As he said, "the neighborhood really wants you to succeed. It is the first place I have found where people are protecting the businesses. " Paolo does his part to create a neighborhood hotspot. He let us know that he often hosts breakfast and yoga sessions in his back garden. As our second course of pappardelle with duck, black truffles, and peas along with pasta decorated with chanterelles covered in melted pecorino cheese arrived, Paolo continued to amuse us with stories from his childhood and his arrival in the US. Paolo may be one of the few Italian restaurateurs who did not receive his love of food from his family. He explained that his mother, though a wonderful woman, was a terrible cook, and that until the age of eighteen, he weighed only ninety pounds. His parents, both pharmacists, assumed that he would follow in their footsteps and study pharmacology at the University of Miami, where he received a scholarship. Arriving in Florida, it did not take long, however, for Paolo to realize that his passion laid elsewhere. While continuing his studies, he got his first job in a restaurant as a dishwasher, and then quickly worked his way up to busboy and bartender. He would leave class early to "go to the bathroom" in order to get to his shift on time. He never dropped a class, though - Paolo is a big believer in education. He has always told his employees, "If you want to go to school, I will help you. I will work with you. "Paolo described his love for the restaurant business because it is a true meritocracy, where promotions happen quickly and fairly. His story of moving up the ladder sounds like a fairy tale: as a dishwasher, he was bullied by the kitchen staff, and his hands were cracked and bleeding because his coworkers would keep unplugging the dishwasher so that he would have to do everything by hand. When his employer, his figurative fairy godmother, found out, she moved him to the front room as a busboy. As the third course arrived and the Manhattan Sideways team indulged in a remarkable veal cutlet Milanese, a beautiful piece of salmon with exceptional spring vegetables, and a whole branzino, we continued to be impressed by Paolo's extraordinary generosity to others in need. He spoke of his effort to teach a trade to a person with Down Syndrome, hoping that by working in his restaurant that this person would have a skill that they can use throughout their life. Paolo also told us about the success of the Manhattan Girls Chorus, a group that was begun in 2011 by a patron of the restaurant, Michelle Oesterle. Her passion for music and her desire to provide an outlet for girls who are experiencing bullying, unpleasant situations at home, learning disabilities, or any of the other difficulties in simply being a teenager, drove her to found this organization. It is here that Michelle is able to provide a safe haven for the girls to come each week to practice and confide in one another. Having had the extraordinary opportunity to attend their first gala at the Baryshnikov Arts Center and to hear these young girls share their stories of their personal struggles was incredibly touching, but then they gathered to sing, and my heart could not stop pounding. They were magnificent. Paolo, too, has been affected by these teenagers and has taken one of them under his wing. In her, he recognized a well-behaved, smart girl who needed help, and he hired her to work in his restaurant. He has now, essentially, become her father: mentoring her, pushing her to be the best person she can be, and, Paolo jokingly said, "I even crack down on any clients who ask for her phone number. " Paolo explained that he has always remembered the woman who promoted him to busboy when he was having a hard time, and will always feel the desire to give people similar opportunities.